Can Pregnant Women Eat Egg Drop Soup? Is It Safe?

When you’re pregnant, many foods that contain eggs suddenly have a question mark over them. Egg drop soup (also known as egg flower soup) is one of the most common soups that pregnant women wonder about.

Can Pregnant Women Eat Egg Drop Soup? Egg Drop Soup is safe in pregnancy because the eggs are ‘cooked’ in the stock. Homemade egg drop soup can be a tasty addition to your pregnancy diet, as it can be adjusted and won’t contain unnecessary additives.

Here’s a quick rundown on how egg drop soup is made, and how to make it yourself in a pregnancy-safe way, too.

Takeout or Restaurant Egg Drop Soup in Pregnancy

The eggs in egg drop soup are safe in pregnancy when it’s made to the standard recipe. This usually means that the eggs are beaten, and then added to boiling stock, then stirred.

The eggs are cooked within a couple of minutes of being in the boiling liquid, which gives them the ‘ribbon’ texture. This also means that they’re cooked through and are pregnancy safe.

When ordering takeout, the egg drop soup should contain egg ribbons that are fully cooked. I’ve never come across egg drop soup takeout that isn’t, but if you want to be super safe, if the soup is not hot when you get it home, give it a couple of minutes in the microwave. It won’t harm the flavor or texture.

When eating at a restaurant or having freshly-made takeout, all you have to remember is that there should be no raw or uncooked egg in egg drop soup. If the eggs are in ribbons, they’re cooked.

You might also be interested in this guide to eating out when you’re pregnant, which includes what to look for when eating Chinese food in pregnancy.

egg drop soup with bean curd and veg

Homemade Egg Drop Soup When You’re Pregnant

Soup is something that is usually healthy and comforting in pregnancy (especially if you’re nauseous).

Egg drop soup can be a great addition to your pregnancy diet because you can adapt it and throw in ingredients like fresh ginger, veggies, and other healthy add-ons to make it into a complete meal.

Restaurant egg drop soup sometimes contains too much salt and/or additives like monosodium glutamate (MSG). Although these aren’t necessarily unsafe in pregnancy, it’s always better to make an additive-free, healthier version.

Here’s a good basic recipe from TheCooknShare. This version is my favorite because it has fresh ginger in it, which gives it a really pleasant kick!

Is Egg Drop Soup Good For Pregnant Women? Is it Healthy?

Eggs (when they’re fully cooked) have a lot of nutrients and minerals in them that are essential in pregnancy. Read more about eating eggs in pregnancy, and their nutritional value here.

Because it’s broth-based rather than creamy, egg drop soup is also a good way of increasing hydration in pregnancy. Soup is on this list of ten drinks you can enjoy in pregnancy, besides water. Plus it’s a good option to have when you can’t keep much solid food down.

It’s even better homemade as you can reduce the salt/sodium level, and increase the healthy additions like vegetables and meat of your choice, such as:

  • Sweetcorn (this is pretty common in restaurant versions)
  • Peas, petits pois, broad beans or similar legumes
  • Finely chopped carrot, celery or onion
  • Chopped water chestnuts
  • Pieces of cooked chicken, fish, cubed ham or similar, thoroughly-cooked meat (don’t put raw meat in the broth – it’s not usually boiled long enough)
  • Adding ramen noodles or pasta can make it more filling, too

Sodium is probably the single unhealthiest part of egg drop soup, so if you’re watching your sodium level, then be aware it can contain up to 800-900mg per serving (source: Nutrition Data).

Overall though, it’s a safe, pregnancy-friendly soup that can be added to your quick, easy to make at home recipes.


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This article has been reviewed and approved for publication in line with our editorial policy.

Gina Waggott, Medically Reviewed by Janet Gordon RD, MBDA

Gina is the owner and founder of Pregnancy Food Checker. She holds a Certification on Nutrition and Lifestyle during Pregnancy from the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich and a Diploma in Human Nutrition. Articles are medically reviewed by Janet Gordon RD, MBDA, a Registered Dietitian specializing in maternal health, including diabetes and obesity in pregnancy.

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